Deep living earthworm Lumbricus terrestris on autumn leaves

Deep living earthworm Lumbricus terrestris on autumn leaves

By taking part in Earthworm Watch in your garden, allotment or other green space near you, the team hope you’ve had the opportunity to record your observations of surface, soil and deep-living earthworms. You can find out more about these earthworm eco-types (which refers to their feeding habits and where they live within the soil) by visiting the science section of our website.

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The Bobbit(t) worm Eunice aphroditois mentioned by Emma Sherlock in her weird wormy wonders talk at the ESB AGM © Jenny Huang CC BY 2.0

The Bobbit(t) worm Eunice aphroditois mentioned by Emma Sherlock in her weird wormy wonders talk at the ESB AGM

© Jenny Huang CC BY 2.0

There has been a society devoted to bird conservation in Britain since 1889 - The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. The Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland was established even earlier, in 1836 for wild plants. Yet both birds and plants in part rely on earthworms to flourish, both as a food source and through their actions in the soil.

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Thanks to all of you who have signed up and submitted data for Earthworm Watch which has seen a surge over the summer period with an increase in the spread of data points. We will be sending out a summary of the Spring/Summer season soon.

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Conversation with Smaug by J.R.R. Tolkien in The Hobbit.

Conversation with Smaug by J.R.R. Tolkien in The Hobbit.

Whilst Earthworm Watch is keen to promote the value that earthworms have through their activities in the soil and how our scientific data (that you are actively helping us to gather) can improve their populations by better understanding their habitats, references to worms in literature, folklore and mythology is a fascinating one.

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A group of citizen scientists in action

Citizen science is people powered research. The term describes a broad spectrum of different types of activities which enable ordinary people, often without formal training, to contribute to scientific research in their spare time. This can take a variety of forms, from outdoor activities such as surveys, wildlife observations and collecting samples, to online crowdsourced projects which are designed to allow individuals to help process huge datasets.

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About Us

Earthworm Watch is a collaboration between Earthwatch Institute (Europe) and the Natural History Museum in London

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